Fullmetal Alchemist: There’s No Such Thing As A Painless Lesson

“There’s no such thing as a painless lesson—they just don’t exist. Sacrifices are necessary. You can’t gain anything without losing something first. Although if you can endure that pain and walk away from it, you’ll find that you now have a heart strong enough to overcome any obstacle. Yeah… a heart made Fullmetal.”
Edward Elric, Fullmetal Alchemist

No one likes pain. No one likes to make sacrifices, but when it comes down to it, we realize that they are a necessity in achieving our goals. Recently, I just suddenly started thinking about Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, one of the best anime that I’ve ever watched (Fullmetal Alchemist would be the manga equivalent). I think about all the sacrifices and struggles that Edward and Alphonse Elric suffered throughout the course of the series in order to reach their goal: getting Al’s body back. How did this all happen?

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The Strange Case of Kotomi Ichinose: Genius Girl

You spot a cute purple-haired girl sitting in the corner of the library barefoot, reading a book…with scissors in her hand. Okay?

You decide to talk to her, thinking she may be ditching class just like you…

Who is this girl? You want to get to know her, so you ask her name, but she takes a while to respond. When she finally responds, she tells you that her name is Kotomi, spelled with three kanji…but she will only respond to Kotomi-chan.

Later, you find out that this girl is ranked top ten in the nation for every subject.

This girl was your childhood friend, and she’s been waiting for you this whole time, only you didn’t remember her…

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Ahh…another one of those Clannad characters that gets you all emotional again. I couldn’t even control myself through After Story…

Meet Kotomi, the character who is introduced to the viewers as a genius girl who doesn’t have any social skills at all. Because of her intelligence level, the school tells her that she doesn’t have to attend classes, so she chooses to spend her time in the school’s library reading as many books as possible, but Tomoya, our main protagonist, usually spots her with a pair of scissors. He questions why she would have those scissors. Why? Let’s go into Kotomi’s past, and how it may have led her to what she is now. Continue reading

The Strange Case of Fuko Ibuki: The Existence of Ikiryō?

A mysterious girl is seen in a dim classroom holding a wooden star with wounded hands. There are rumors saying that she may be a ghost. Further research tells you that a person of the same description was involved in a car accident a while back and is currently in a coma…

How are you being able to talk and physically interact with this person?

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Recently, I’ve started to watch Clannad, an anime, according to my friend, that gets you very emotional. Okay. Sounds like a solid story. So I decided to check it out. So a couple episodes in and this is already setting up for emotions flying everywhere. Continue reading

I Prefer to Listen to Japanese Music While Working

I’m a man of all different types of music. Pop, hip-hop, rap, R&B, soul, and occasionally even country. You name it. And as a budding otaku, I am also into calmer modern Japanese music (not classical, that’s probably the one genre—I can’t even—). So I find myself listening to anime OPs and EDs and various other J-music while working, whether it’d be homework or paperwork or among other stuff. But why?

Japanese music is not only actual quality music, but I also usually don’t understand a single word of it. And how is that in any way good?

It’s common to hear that listening to music with lyrics while doing another assignment is not efficient because the assignment that you’re doing will likely have words as well, meaning that the probability of you taking in that info while listening to that song wouldn’t be very high. Although, that is when you listen to a song with lyrics you understand. Japanese music, however, has lyrics that I can not understand, so then it basically becomes a part of the instrumental to me. Continue reading